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How Much Does a Housekeeper Cost?

It’s almost time for spring cleaning. Maybe you’re thinking about finding someone to help with all the chores you have lined up? But if you’ve never hired a housekeeper before, you’re probably wondering how much you should pay.

What you pay depends, in large part, on the type of job you want done. Factors like the size of your home, special requirements (like cleaning the windows or shampooing the carpets), or how messy things have gotten during the winter all affect how much you pay.

As a general rule, if you live in a medium-sized apartment or home in a city, you should plan to pay around $100 for cleaning services that come twice a month. That drops to $75 if you’re in the suburbs. However, you’ll pay more if you go through a chain service (sometimes even double the rate of a person who runs their own housekeeping business). Often, though, you can get a discount if you decide to set up regular visits from a housekeeper.

If you’d like a little more information on what to pay a housekeeper, check out this Care.com article. Or if you need help hiring a housekeeper, we’ve written about that in the past, too.

Think Spring (cleaning)!
Comments
User
Feb. 22, 2016

I respect my health, time, and I learn to be picky when coming to choosing the people for who I will work. I charge 20$ per h and up to afford normal life. I can't imagine working for 10$ per h.
I know I'm good in what I'm doing, and people should be appreciate somebody doing "dirty" job for them.

User
Feb. 21, 2016

I respect my health, time, and I learn to be picky when coming to choosing the people for who I will work. I charge 20$ per h and up to afford normal life. I can't imagine working for 10$ per h. I know I'm good in what I'm doing, and people should be appreciate somebody doing "dirty" job for them.

User
Dec. 15, 2015

Jonathan: Changing the maid's rate every time you do an errand yourself would cause anyone to flip out. If you suddenly cut her wages by a third without prior negotiation, it is not surprising that she no longer wants to work for you. She makes plans for her own life based on the wages that you discussed.Think how you would feel if your employer suddenly on a whim decided to adjust your pay without warning.

User
Dec. 15, 2015

Jonathan: Changing the maid's rate every time you do an errand yourself would cause anyone to flip out. If you suddenly cut her wages by a third without prior negotiation, it is not surprising that she no longer wants to work for you. She makes plans for her own life based on the wages that you discussed.Think how you would feel if your employer suddenly on a whim decided to adjust your pay without warning. Next time that you get a maid, remember that she is a human being with a life of her own. Adjusting paycheck, asking her to report earlier, work different days, work later all affect her life and need prior consultation and as much advance warning as possible. If she is willing to make accommodations, you should be grateful and respect (reward) of her flexibility. You must respect your household help if you want to find and keep good workers. Other thoughts: when you go on vacation does not mean that you maid should not be paid. She still has bills to cover. If you cannot stand the idea of paying someone for doing nothing, give her some task to do while you are gone.....windows, floors, etc. .... stuff that is hard to do while the family is running through the house.

User
Dec. 6, 2015

Re: Pandora Spocks

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