Stay-at-home guidelines by state for families and caregivers

April 8, 2020

Federal, state and local governments are quickly adopting new guidelines to try to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. In some states, governors have now gone as far as to issue “stay-at-home” (sometimes called shelter-in-place) mandates for all citizens. These are the strictest restrictions to date, and as a parent or caregiver, you’re likely wondering how this may affect you.

Generally speaking, when a stay-at-home order is given, only essential workers are allowed to leave their home to go to work. Each state can define what an essential worker is, but it’s usually someone who performs a service that is vital to the day-to-day wellbeing of the community. In addition to frontline healthcare workers, grocery workers, civil servants and other trades are often considered “essential.”

Below is a list of states and cities that, as of the publish date of this article, have issued “stay-at-home” mandates and whether child care workers can continue to work in a family’s home. However, the information is high level and may not apply to your specific situation. Additionally, some municipalities and local governments may have adopted additional requirements, so please also check with your state and local authorities for up-to-date information.

Check back with this page for updates, continue to take precautions to keep yourself and others safe and read our coronavirus FAQs for further safety tips.

Alabama:

Child care workers can continue to work in a family’s home. See the state of Alabama’s order for more information.

Alaska:

Families may continue to have their child care employee work in their home. See the Governor of Alaska’s order for more information.

Arizona:

Nannies and other child care providers can continue to work in a family’s home. See the Governor of Arizona’s executive order for more information.

California: 

Only essential workers are allowed to have a child care employee in their home. See the state of California’s website for more information.

Colorado:

Nannies and babysitters are allowed to keep working in a family’s home. Read the Executive Order from the Governor of Colorado’s website for more information.

  • Denver, CO:
    Families with in-home child care needs may continue to have their caregiver work in their home. Visit the city of Denver’s website for more information.

Connecticut:

Families with child care needs can continue having their employee work in their home. Visit the state of Connecticut’s website for more information.

Delaware:

Child care workers may continue to work in a family’s home. See the state of Delaware’s website for more information.

Florida:

Families can continue having their child care employees work in their home. See the Governor of Florida’s executive order for more information.

Georgia:

Families with child care needs can continue having their employee work in their home. See the Governor of Georgia’s website for more information.

Hawaii:

Child care workers may continue working in a family’s home. See the Governor of Hawaii’s proclamation for more information.

Idaho:

Families can continue to have their child care employee work in their home. See the order from the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare for more information.

Illinois:

Families with in-home child care needs can continue having their caregiver work in their home. See the governor of Illinois’ executive order for more information.

Indiana:

Families may continue to have their child care employee come to their home for work. See the Governor of Indiana’s executive order for more information.

Kansas:

Child care workers may continue to work in a family’s home. See the Governor of Kansas’ executive order for more information.

Kentucky:

In-home child caregivers may continue to work in a family’s home. See the Governor of Kentucky’s executive order for more information.

Louisiana:

Unless a family’s child care employee is another family member, only essential workers can have their child care employee working in their home. See the Governor of Louisiana’s proclamation for more information.

Maine:

Families can continue having their child care employee come to their home. See the Governor of Maine’s executive order for more information.

Maryland:

Families with child care employees can continue having them work in their home. See the Governor of Maryland’s order for more information.

Massachusetts:

Child care workers are considered to be essential workers and are allowed to work in a family’s home. See the state of Massachusetts’ website for more information.

Michigan:

In-home child care workers may continue to work in a family’s home. Visit the state of Michigan’s website for more information.

Minnesota:

Unless a family’s child care employee is a friend or another family member, only essential workers can have their child care employee working in their home. See the Governor of Minnesota’s executive order for more information.

Mississippi:

Only essential workers are allowed to have a child care employee in their home. See the Governor of Mississippi’s executive order for more information.

Missouri:

Families with child care needs can continue to have their employee work in their home. See the Governor of Missouri’s website for more information.

Montana:

Families may continue to have their child care employee work in their home. See the Governor of Montana’s executive order for more information.

Nevada:

In-home child care is not considered an essential service. See the Governor of Nevada’s website for more information.

New Hampshire:

Child care workers can continue working in a family’s home. See the Governor of New Hampshire’s executive order for more information.

New Jersey:

Families may continue to have their nanny or sitter come to their home to work. See the declaration from the state of New Jersey for more information.

New Mexico:

In-home child care is not considered an essential service. See the public health order from the New Mexico Department of Health for more information.

New York:

In-home child care is considered an essential service, so caregivers can continue working in a family’s home. Visit the state of New York’s website for more information.

North Carolina:

Families can continue having their child care provider work in their home. See the Governor of North Carolina’s executive order for more information.

Ohio:

Nannies and other child care workers are allowed to keep working in a family’s home. Read the statement from the Ohio Department of Health for more information.

Oregon:

Families may continue to have their nanny or babysitter work in their home. See the state of Oregon’s website for more information.

Pennsylvania: 

Child care workers can travel to a family’s home for work. Visit the Governor of Pennsylvania’s website for more information.

Rhode Island:

Families may continue to have their child care worker come to their home. See the Governor of Rhode Island’s executive order for more information.

South Carolina:

Child care workers can continue to work in a family’s home. See the Governor of South Carolina’s executive order for more information.

Tennessee:

Families may continue to have their child care employee work in their home. See the Governor of Tennessee's executive order for more information.

Texas:

Only essential workers are allowed to have a child care employee in their home. See the state of Texas’ website for more information.

Vermont:

Families may continue to have a child care worker in their home. See the Governor of Vermont’s executive order for more information.

Virginia:

Child care services are considered essential, so nannies and babysitters can continue working in a family’s home. See the Governor of Virginia’s executive order for more information.

Washington:

Unless a family’s child care employee is a friend or another family member, only essential workers can have their child care employee working in their home. See the Governor of Washington’s guidance bulletin for more information.

Washington, D.C.

Nannies and other in-home child care workers can continue to work in a family’s home. See the order from the Office of the Mayor of D.C.’s website for more information.

West Virginia:

Families may continue to have their child care employee work in their home. See the Governor of West Virginia’s executive order for more information.

Wisconsin:

Families can continue having their child care worker come to their home. See the Governor of Wisconsin’s order for more information.

Tips and stories from parents and caregivers who’ve been there.

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