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💰What are your tips for negotiating pay rates? 💰

Diane Hoelter
Aug. 25, 2018

Last week we asked you "Do you use written agreements with your families? Why or why not?  We got lots of answers for and against agreements.  This week our question is:

 

What are your tips for negotiating pay rates? 

Answers

It's good to honor the care provider's pay rates, the same as you would any other service provider (i.e. plumber, electrician, cab driver). Most childcare workers make very low wages, compared to other professional positions, yet the work and attention involved is great. Childcare providers usually price their services, based on how many children they're caring for, how much their commuting costs are, their skill level for high quality care, while still trying to compete with the abyssimally low rates asked by very low quality, high child to adult ratio day cares, where children cannot receive the attention they need. This is one of the most important services if we are to raise the future of humanity to be loving, responsible, respectful, caring, compassionate adults. The care your child receives will likely be directly proportional to what you pay. What is the emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual health and development of your child worth? Your care provider will be very influential in all of this, so I suggest you choose wisely and if you feel you cannot afford your desired care giver's rates, perhaps look at where in your financial budget space can be made to pay for whoever you feel will give your child the best care. Do you really need those new pair of shoes, movie tickets or brand new toys for your child every week, or extra ice cream? When your priorities shift, the means and way will show themselves. Your child deserves the best and if care-givers are super flexible on their rates, they may be stressed out and desperate. They may not be able to Give the best care. Trust your intuition overall.

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User in Granby, CT
Nov. 8, 2018

I usually negotiate rates depending on what is asked as a nanny/babysitter i.e. clean house, make dinner, watch children, help with animals in the household. Some families ask more of me then others, so that would be the deciding point on what rate to ask the family for per hour.

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Well, I think it is pretty tricky this. Parent side: If you agree to pay less because you do not "want or need" some chores, then you may need them and if you ask because you do not have a choice, probably your nanny would do it but will not be happy with it, this kind of actions adds up and could contaminate the relationship. As a nanny is really annoying that they do not want to pay the right rate and keep bargain, then keep adding more chores. At the end you will have to keep doing what they are asking you to do, some times not in the better mood. BETTER TIP: If you think your nanny did EXTRA JOB (parties, family visitors, moving, extra kids for what ever reason) it is so nice to get a tip for it.

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Always inform employers or possible employers of your need for a higher pay scale based on why you need it. I always inform employers or possible employers that I am a college student and this is one of my only forms of income. Most people are very understanding and will work with you!

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User in Irvine, CA
Oct. 5, 2018

Share your qualifications and education/experience with the family. If you have Early Childhood Education, or Child Development credits, tell the families, use your experience and knowledge to help negotiate your rates.

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Merlys in Miami, FL
Oct. 28, 2018

The nanny aims to take care of the physical and emotional integrity of the children who care for their proper development, additional tasks such as washing, cleaning, caring for pets and shopping. My advice is, that these additional tasks should be considered to increase the salary.

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My pay rate is determined in the amount of hours required to work. How far the travel time is. And what is required as extra - housekeeping, laundry or transportation services. And the method of payment is the main factor.

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Just be comfortable with each other and not too demanding.

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it depends on how long they needs me

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I would saying coming to a compromise about a price.

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I have never used written agreements but I believe that it makes it more professional and safe for both parts. My tips are: Be honest about your expectation, charge accordingly to the time and location your are working, try to have an open communication with your employers about any doubt or anything related to your payment,always do your best and beyond.

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I would say be kind. Ask the employee what they would prefer and if that is not affordable express it and you'll easily come to an understanding.

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I just go with facts.

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Depending on the situation it varies, the more kids the more money people tend to say. I say the ages, number of kids and tasks ask to be performed matter. For example if they are younger kids and sleep most the time they shouldn't be a large amount of money being spent for pay. If they are older and need to be taken to school and cooked for the price should be a little higher.

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Myre in Nanuet, NY
Aug. 29, 2018

Good questions....

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i don't tips for negotiating pay rate, i would like the my salary pay rate, because is doing part the my job.

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Make sure the parents know what work is involved with the number of children. Explain how you plan on helping them. It's instrumental in the family determining how much they're willing to pay.

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Carmen in Austin, TX
Aug. 29, 2018

In order to negotiate the payment rates, the work to be done is evaluated, as well as the time and effort required. an initial payment is negotiated with a view to a not distant future. A test time is established from the beginning. But the best way to negotiate is to invite them to see your work and evaluate it, then you can continue negotiating.

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Negotiating pay rates helps with a variety of things, such as; college for teens, or helping save up. Pay rates should go up eventually to cover future goals.

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Tiara in Cypress, TX
Aug. 29, 2018

make sure they are neagotioble

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I negotiate pay rates by several factors. The number of kids, the duties expected, driving kids around, and the distance I will travel to their home. If their home is close by, I may come down on my rate a little because that will save me in the long run in gas and travel time.

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I tell parents what I charge and why I'm worth it. They tend to agree when they read my reviews.

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I do research before I go: what is average rate for one child in my city? Do they have more than one kid (add), do they want services other than child care(more),can they likely afford more than the average, based on where they live?

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User in Loveland, CO
Dec. 7, 2018

I really rely on families being honest about their desired pay rates on the site and I first look for jobs that mimic my desired pay scale. From there I set my rates to match the amount of house cleaning, meal prep, transportation they need outside of basic childcare. I tend to go above and beyond for the families I work for and I want what I am paying to reflect that. If they aren't willing to pay for the amount of work they expect, I will tell them I will work for that pay but I won't do certain tasks on top of it. I have had a lot of families post jobs stating they will pay $15-$30 an hour try to as me my desired pay and then ask if I will meet them at half of what I ask for. You cannot negotiate with people who have no respect for childcare. I don't stick the children in front of a TV all day, I am up and active creating games, promoting reading and learning, encouraging them to challenge themselves. I do a lot of research of different things I could do to help the children I watch promote and grow and I expect to be paid for the work I put in.

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Firmness in what the nanny feels is a good rate with her experience and references. It is always best to negotiate a fair rate with the family that will meet both family and nanny needs.

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Pay can be a very sensitive subject, although it is a very important topic. When I interview with a family, I always respectfully discuss it with them. My rates are typically always the same, and if they offer more of course I accept it. If they request to pay less than what I ask, we talk about the reasoning on both ends and always try to come to a compromise. Sometimes families have situations that I dont always know about and I always take that into consideration. While I nanny because I have to live and take care of myself, that is not my sole purpose of doing it. I am more into the job for the kids, and to pursue my passion I have for children.I have never let pay get in the way working for a family that needs me.

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Gigi in Tucson, AZ
Dec. 7, 2018

First off if the family is needing a Driver, House Cleaner, Child and "must be comfortable with pets care giver and a Chef then $10.50 an hour is not enough. Look at what Molly Maids get per hour, look at prices for UBER/LYFT, look at prices for personal chef..... A total house manager pay is far more than what employers are offering.

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I feel the best way to negotiate is to only only ask for what you are worth through you compassion, experience and commitment to caring for others.

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My pricing always reflects what I am doing for transportation, the age of the children, and whether or not I can work from home. It also makes a difference if I am doing housework and cleaning. If they are not going to withhold taxed I usually ask them to pay me a little more to make up the difference.

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Layna in Mchenry, IL
Aug. 29, 2018

I usually ask first what the family had in mind, and if they didn't have a set amount in mind, I tell them my average hourly rate. In the past, the only issue I ever had in terms of pay was an incident where my employer stopped paying what they had agreed and didn't communicate their intent to do so. I accepted the reduced pay twice without saying anything, and then the third time politely told them that due to school and other commitments I would not be able to continue working at that rate. I think it's important to be flexible in terms of money and not to be greedy or try to take advantage of families- but also, it's important to know your worth as a caregiver. As with everything else, be polite and professional!

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Ayana in Brooklyn, NY
Sept. 18, 2018

tips are whatever you and the family think is fair for the work that you are doing with their kids and household should be discussed fairly.

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Mya in Orting, WA
Sept. 18, 2018

I negotiate with how many kids their are and what the couple or single parents income is like.

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Deborah in Vista, CA
Sept. 18, 2018

I let them state their price first, then tell them all my attributes and how I can be an asset

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User in Plant City, FL
Sept. 18, 2018

Crucial! how many people is working at home, List of responsibilities also the client needs.

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Put it all on the table - what you want, how much you will get and when and how you will be paid. Be specific and keep your word about your obligations.

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Adina in Sparks, NV
Sept. 18, 2018

I simply read the responsibilities listed & decide what I want. If we meet I tell them what I want and what they will get for that price.

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I got tips, for example on holidays and christmas.

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Hi :) I keep a portfolio with pictures of the many activities I have done with kids during my career: I have pictures of us hanging out, reading, doing hand-and-crafts, sleeping, eating, etc... I also have pictures of us hanging out with their parents. I included any present given to me by the kids, like drawings. And I also share with them my reviews from the families I have worked for. It helps a lot that I try to understand them as a family and explained them how my approach to child care will sync with their life/parenting style. Above all, perhaps one of the most important things: I KNOW MY WORTH and I don't settle for less than fair. I have been lucky enough to have worked with amazing families that have recognized it. I think they can feel my passion for this field and my desire to do my best for the well-being of children. I keep formally educating myself in Early Childhood Development and along with my +8 years of experience, I think that it also helped me to negotiate a fair salary :)

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User in Las Vegas, NV
Sept. 4, 2018

Written agreements is necessary for some (not my case). You must build yourself up so that other employers can see and evaluate you. From this point, you must prove why you are the one for the job by showing different types of skills (that others may not have) to get the job done. This way, you become more attractive & trustworthy to that employer and able to negotiate the pay rate. If your pay rate is near or close to your employer's rate, you must give a reason why you need higher pay (travel time, more duties, etc). If employer sees/confirms that you are trustworthy, then he/she will not hesitate to give you higher pay. Don't go too far from employer's offer.

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Margie in Arvada, CO
Sept. 2, 2018

I always work within a Family range of needs. Rates on this site are usually in a range format one can work with. I don't use written agreements. Nor have I been asked to. The more you formalize, the more we will be expected to pay/charge, in my opinion. Agreements can hinder family needs.

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My tip is you can always ask for more. The worst they can say is no. But be aware of your experience and be able to tell them why you should be paid more e.g. because it is the going rate or your experience merits it. Don't say something like you are the best person for the job because they already know that, that is why they offered it to you. My tip would be asking for 10% more. That way they may come back that they can offer you 5% more or they may just say no, in which you did not lose anything. Never be afraid to explain your worth but if you ask and they say no, do not try to convince them or argue. That is not professional and could hurt you in the future. Also, be aware of who you are negotiating with. A single mother of 3 children may have little room for negotiation, while other people may be able to pay a little more for someone with more experience. Whatever you do, always be professional and know your worth while also being realistic. If you don't know what your worth is, who will? Good luck!

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When negotiating pay rates, I like to see first how many children I will be taking care of. Second, what duties/responsibilities I will have. And lastly, I give them a range and we go from there. Some families are willing to pay more also depending on your experience and what you plan on doing to improve their knowledge or skills. It all really depends on the family.

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1. Know what the standard pay rate is in your area. 2. Keep a record of what you do for the family. You may be doing more than they realize. 3. Don't be afraid to negotiate. 4. When you do negotiate, be prepared. Give reasons that you should be making the pay you are asking for. Don't just ask for more because you want or need it. 5. Be respectful!

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I believe that clear communication and respect are two key components to a healthy relationship, be it personal or professional. When negotiating pay rates, it is important that parents and caregivers communicate clearly what expectations they might have and if possible, come to a mutual agreement on pay. I believe there is safety in written agreements because it provides a needed sense of security for both parties involved. At the end of the day, an unhealthy relationship between parents and caregivers can ultimately affect the children involved so it is important to clear up any doubts and put everything on the table before initiating a professional relationship.

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User in Buda, TX
Nov. 22, 2018

As a nanny you know your worth and the lifestyle you wan to live. A nanny evaluation form is a wonderful tool to know if your employers appreciate your performance at the job well enough as to match your worth and your life style. Please let me know if you need help with this form. You can find them for free online.

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Iva in Berkeley, CA
Sept. 28, 2018

Before beginning a negotiation, you must: Know the Market Show interest Think beyond salary - If an employer cannot meet your salary request, think about negotiating for other items in your compensation package.

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User in Princeton, NJ
Sept. 25, 2018

sorry , I don't know

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well i can charge 10 dollar per hours , but only work from my home , i have one daughter to care so , thanks

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Honest open discussion

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Lara in Flushing, NY
Sept. 25, 2018

all depends ... what can of things do they need to be done before i go home

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Jennelle in Memphis, TN
Sept. 24, 2018

Depends on the family

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Debbie in Coats, NC
Sept. 24, 2018

I like to be fair in my negotiating pay rates according to what I do in my position and the time I spend in taking care of your loved one. I also take into account if I need to commute very far that would also go into the negotiation on how much my pay rate would be.

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depends on what our agreements are what the family expects from me and what i expects from them.

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Almedia in Houston, TX
Sept. 23, 2018

When families posted the job on Care.com they also include the job requirements and expectations up front. If you get hired and except the position that is the agreement. Now, If you start working and something change and the family for example add a pet, which was not in the home at the time and you do not like animals that is a breach of the agreement. It is up to the individual whether they feel they want a written agreement or not.

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I think it just depends on the agreement with the family and what it entails. I definitely thing a job description from the family is helpful. Just because that way you know exactly what their expectations are.

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they must be fair in wages, every day food, gasoline, etc. go up in price, it is usually every year. nanny or babysitter we have to have an agreement with the families that are hiring us from the beginning for the increase of salary and benefits.

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Brenda in Las Vegas, NV
Sept. 22, 2018

when you are a professional and you have over 25 years of experience in this sector, your rate should not be negotiable if parents wish the best care/caretaker for their children.

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Ashley in San Juan, PR
Sept. 22, 2018

Consider the distance and time it takes your caregiver to get to your home, as well as the desired time of service for the day and number of children to be cared for. It may be easier to set a pay rate for the day instead of hourly.

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I think it is important to have a documented agreement for both parties.

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My name is Belkis I am 53 Years old, I have 5 children of my own so I have the experience needed and much more. I previously worked in a daycare facility and so I am very familiar with caring for children in every way possible. I have 8 grandchildren whom I've been caring for the past 5 years. I will assist with every aspect of the daily routine, while I do not drive I am willing to assist with other duties aside from childcare such as doing laundry, and helping cleaning around the home.

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I think based on the child's age and their needs should be applied to each pay rate.

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Be fair and provide top notch service.

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I am a trusting person. Given an agreed salary, I'm fine.

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Consider the distance being traveled to get to your job and the number of children under your care, the younger the more work from cleaning messes and one and one time and attention recommended.

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Michilli in Holland, MI
Sept. 20, 2018

It all depends on the family, but it never hurts to have your agreement in a text, email or written out and signed.

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Depends on number of children and ages the providers is watching.

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Andrea in Brooklyn, NY
Sept. 20, 2018

If your respobilities increase so should your pay.

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Peter in Bethlehem, PA
Sept. 19, 2018

Being flexible without asking too little or too much.

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Ameerah in Seattle, WA
Sept. 19, 2018

I don't know

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User in Cibolo, TX
Sept. 19, 2018

Do research and invest in every aspect of care

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Irene in Lakeport, CA
Sept. 19, 2018

The main thing, in my opinion, is doing what is comfortable for all parties involved. A written contract is fine, but if both parties are feeling comfortable with eachother, a verbal contract can be just as binding. As for the wage. I will give the family a no. that is comfortable for me but keeping in mind there has to be some give and take to make the no. comfortable and doable for everyone.

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Cady in Cortland, NY
Sept. 19, 2018

I am extremely flexible! I understand that some families may not have the proper funds, but still need care. Ex: if there are multiple children we can negotiate a price to best fit you or when payment will be.

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Amy in Zuni, VA
Sept. 19, 2018

That fact needs to be negotiated at the initial interview b/c it can be a make or break deal. For applicants, I would never apply to a job that the salary posted is too low for you to accept.

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