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advice on hiring 24 hour care -

User in Hancock, NY
April 23, 2018

it is becoming evident that my dad will need 24 hour care - a nursing home isn't an option right now.  what do i need to know about hiring a live in caretaker?  any tips on having a person in the home?  tip on payments or what to keep track of? rules? expectations? etc. ANYTHING anyone wants to share with me would be great.  i'm really struggling and overwhelmed with all of this.  TIA

Answers
User in El Paso, TX
April 1, 2019

If I were hiring a live-in, 24 hour caregiver, I would look for someone older, because young caregivers, while energetic, tend to have more active social lives that can intrude on the dedication required to devote oneself to this type of position. At the interview, I would ask about their personal life, boyfriends, children, etc.. If they have their phone turned on and interrupt the interview to answer it more than once, that is not a good sign. too much time spent on the phone, social media, etc. can interfere with care. A drug screening is essential. There are basically two types of caregivers - those who do it because they love looking after seniors and have genuine compassion for the elderly (that would be me), and those who do it for the paycheck.

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You want someone with lots of experience and good references, someone that is understanding of hi age and circumstances of his illness. Pay wise you will need to understand whoever is doing it that they need to be compensated fairly as they are leaving heir home to be in his an d be there 7 days a week 168 hours per week. They will need a private room & bath ND Ability to launder their clothes and their meals should be include. I is fair to say that anywhere from 240 per day and up is what you can expect to pay a caregiver. Good luck and interview them very well.

User in Hancock, NY
April 2, 2017

Typically,specialcare, Treatment as /#special an _young,person's ,other,inq. Specialattentions,diet,?ect...

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You will want to hire at least 2-3 caregivers, and have a rotation. Some do it one week on, one off and the 3rd person for back up. Some do it days of the week, 1 person for Mondays, Tue, Wed e/o weekend. The other person the other days. etc.

Room and board for "compensation" is not compensation for most people caring for others in others homes, as they have their own home. They must have their own room, and ideally their own bathroom. All meals are usually included. 

You can do background checks through reputable companies (just like a larger company would do) as well as obtain 3 references. Drug testing is usually useless as it is only as good as the last time they consumed a substance, and tests do not cover all drugs, and the more drugs they cover the mores spendy they are. 

I would do 2 interviews, one with you and the interviewee and then if you like them bring them back for a 2nd interview with your loved one. 

You should have a job description and duties check list (these are easy to copy off the internet) so that you both have a clear understanding of what is expected. You should also have the employee document each day on what duties were accomplished etc. (again these forms are available to purchase on the internet) 

A nanny cam in non private areas is not a horrible idea either, but be upfront with the interviewee that one will be in use. 

If you are concerned with care needs in the middle of the night, you will need a monitor (like a baby monitor) so that the care giver can respond. IF they are awake for more than 2 hours in the night total you should compensate accordingly. (If you hired a company in the midwest it would be over $700 day for caregivers that need to be awake) 

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User in Ukiah, CA
Jan. 12, 2019

Definitely hire someone with good references from families of previous clients. Id ask if this person would act as if this were their father in an emergency situation.Always keep track of pay. Also having the caregiver keep a daily log of what medications and what time, when your father is bathed and if he is eating ok. I would suggest keeping this log to yourself for reasons of your fathers dignity. It is good for you for emergencies or for history if the doctor needs to know.Please listen to your father and show up unexpected a few times as I have had personal experience of seeing caregivers take away rights of clients in their own home. (I did file complaints)I believe the last years or months should be enjoyable and only someone with respect and compassion for their elders should do this.

User in Hancock, NY
April 3, 2017

absolutely -- thanks. i'm very involved in dad's care --- i just can't be there all the time -- definately will keep track of stuff, and i've even considered cameras ;)

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User in Frisco, TX
Oct. 18, 2017

I would consider 3 caregivers each having eight hour sifts. It is not putting so much on one caregiver. This gives your father better care and the caregiver should be able to do lighthouse work and cleaning. It is important to help your father with bathing, toiletries, laundry, meal preparation, grocery shopping, doctors appointments and etc. As long as your father is able to be active the caregivers should take him out of the house even shopping for his need with them. That is my thoughts and hope it helps. Sincerely, Ann Fisher McKinney, TX

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User in Cleveland, OH
Jan. 12, 2019

Sometimes it is hard to find a live in caregiver. I would try to find multiple people to provide round the clock care. I worked with a family,and we had multiple caregivers. Worked out great. We had a monthly schedule made out, we got paid every Saturday. It went so smoothly. Ask for references, from coworkers and other clients. Set some ground rules. Don't be afraid of drawing a line with certain thinga. The more you communicate they better.

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It is a good idea to make sure you have a full documented back ground check and Nursing check. Ask for their CNA/RN if number, you will be able to check the state records for abuse/neglect as well as when they were certified or licensed and expiration dates. Also know that not everyone with "something" on their record is a bad person but you can do extra things to spend time with the new employee before having them in your home to work such as lunch dates and meetings about expectations. Group each important conversation into separate dates/get-together so you can see this new person in different lights and learn their real character..are you comfortable with them is what you should trust. Also consider a nanny cam. Very cheap and tiny on Amazon. Great reviews and easy to plug into computer to view each day. Keep loved ones safe. I hope this helps!

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Marina in Lennox, SD
Oct. 19, 2017

If you get in touch with an in home care agency, someone there can actually go through all these questions with you. But as an aid who has done in home care, I would recommend always meeting the people prior to them taking care of your parents, you can read people and choose who YOU want. When they get to your home you can discuss where they would be staying (guest bedroom?) what foods they can have/make, rules you would like--no phones while on duty, no guests-- you choose what you would like. Expectations of cleaning (keeping busy, you're paying them for this!) Keep track of the aids that come to your home. In one situation, I worked for lady who once in awhile be left with hands prints, so we had to back track schedules to figure out..blah blah--- just be aware so you can request not to have that certain person anymore. Payment, like any job is base off years of experience AND the amount of work.. I mean, are they toileting and bathing him? If not, 10-16 is a good range other wise if its more personal things, 15-20 would be better. .... Anyway! Like i said, if you would rather be less overwhelmed, go through an agency, it'll take a load off!

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My family had to hire care for my father for a while. A few tips: It's hard for one person to be there all the time. You might consider hiring multiple people. I would also get anything and everything valuable out of the house; we had multiple things disappear, tho it may even have been my father "gave" things to them. Point is, sometimes older people can be taken advantage of in one way or another; either they are unaware of what is being rifled through and taken, or they are talked into giving someone something without clearly understanding what they are saying, nor will they remember doing it (of course, this depends on the person). It is very hard to be absolutely sure of someone, even with great references. I'd also recommend having camera surveillance, which can be done relatively inexpensively with devices that link to a smart phone. Knowing they might be observed at any time is a great way to make sure people stay honest, and, it's reassuring for you to see that Dad is, indeed, being cared for well. Most caregivers, I want to think, are wonderful people who truly care and do their best, but there are always a few in any profession that are there for the wrong reasons. Make sure the people you hire will follow instructions and guidelines. Some examples of otherwise great caretakers in my experience: some played the tv or music all the time, with no regard for my father's tastes. My father was easy going to the point that he didn't speak up if he disliked it, but can you imagine being in your own home and having to listen to and watch things you don't like, all the time? Others cooked meals and brought treats because they were so sweet..and so were the treats. And my father was highly diabetic. Make sure caretakers can and will follow dietary restrictions, and know how to cook healthy meals.

Different people will have different strengths, which is another reason to hire different people. Some will be great at socializing in a way that your father enjoys. Some will be wonderful at making sure medications and schedules are followed, and these are typically the people who also are great at keeping things tidy. Some will be wonderful cooks. Some will be strong and very able to help with bathing and toileting. Cameras are wonderful to show you who stays on the couch unless they HAVE to do something, and who's rarely on the couch because they're always doing something for your father or the house, and who has multiple talents and who has limited areas of expertise.

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First check the type of insurance your father has. Depending on your father's current needs. Make sure in writing, your father needs are clear, so you and the caretaker are on the same page. Be sure to check the persons out before having before bringing them into your home. I'd want to pay by direct deposit or on the books, so there always is a record of payment and there are no mix ups with payment records at anytime. The person you employ essentionally owns their business. The only way they're successfull is by pleasing their client. Getting feedback on how to improve and knowing if they are doing a good job. I hope this helps.

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Hello. Find out what insurance will cover as well as resources they will allow.

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You have to hire depend on his condition health.

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live in caregiver is 5 days from $850. and up depend on the clients care needs. Includ board and lodging/food of the caregiver. The rate is for single person caring only. time like 8am Monday to 8Pm Friday and Saturday Sunday is another pay. If the Clients live alone? the caregiver does everything for the clients. This is my experiences.Driving the clients to appointments must use clients car for the client own services. Best luck foryour Searching. Lyn

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Misti in Horton, AL
Oct. 19, 2017

I think it's very important to interview potential caregivers with your Dad present and it may sound crazy but at some point you just have to go with your gut. Never hesitate to give someone a chance but if they aren't meeting your expectations or your father isn't happy then find someone else and keep interviewing until you find the RIGHT person that fits your needs and is within your budget. That person is out there you just have to find them!! Good luck with your search.

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Look into finding a nursing student that will provide care at night/live-in in exchange for room/board. Then, place an ad for either a couple of part-time independent care providers (CNA's, LPN's, RN's) working or retired to put together a schedule for the hours the student has to be at schools or clinicals. Its an ideal place that is quiet for the student to study at, afford schooling, and receive the experience they need also...all the while helping out your dad. Hope this helps! Good Luck! Deb RN

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Set interviews up with prospective HHA. Be honest about the expected hours of employment. I would suggest that you have two FULL TIME EMPLOYEES AND A PERMANENT WEEK PERSON.

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User in Tampa, FL
Jan. 21, 2019
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Paul in Rockford, IL
Jan. 15, 2019

Complex answer. While the details are on http://www.alzheimershomehealt... . The skinny is try to have as few people as possible in the home. Hire privately and do a background check on that person. Come up with a system to track expenses in the same way you balance your credit card. Have the caregiver keep a log. If you need help for your wealthy parents with Alzheimer's anywhere in the US, visit my profile.

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Check criminal and credit background. Also, check personal and professional references. When you think you have found someone that will work, have them spend a 24 period with your dad while you are present in the home only to observe. Then you can see how they will be together. The 24 hour trial period should paid for at an agreed upon rate between you and the caregiver.

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Annie in Lakewood, NJ
Oct. 23, 2018

with 24hr care 7 days a week you will need 2 people and maybe a 3rd. most people have lives and can't do 7days a week. the reason why is that you have 2 people that can cover each other shifts when the 1st can't work or has something the need to do.then u won't have to move your schedule around or try and find someone to cover their shift. just explain to the caretaker what u expect them to do being reasonable. things that u would do for ur love one. and pay them a reasonable salary. make sure u feel u can trust his person that they will take care of ur love on and not take advantage.keep track of the days they are there to make sure they are paid and ur not cheated.

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Laura in Garner, NC
Oct. 15, 2018

1) Pay at least $150/day 2) Have a backup and encourage the live in to take several days off per month. No one wants to feel like a slave and that's what starts to happen when they don't have time to themselves. 3) Run a background check 4) Remember, people always put their best foot forward. If anything seems off during the interview, pass them over. 5) Keep communication open. Make them feel at ease about hard conversations.

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Hoai in Orlando, FL
Sept. 9, 2018

You should make set of rules that the caregiver have to follow. It'll better if you, caregiver, witnesses to sign and notary the contract. You've the right to ask for the caregiver for background check, license and many more

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It's possible that your father could qualify for aide services in the home through his health insurance provider or through government agencies such as the Office of Aging. If your father is low income, apply for Medicaid. Medicaid offers home based services which may be a good start. If he requires round the clock care, you can make your own arrangements with private hire caregivers, offering room and board in exchange for services. If your father qualifies for hospice care, that is another good option that can provide needed supports.

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Contact your local home care providers.

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Alan in Nutley, NJ
Aug. 8, 2018

Many quality individuals will help with 24 hour care, but I feel splitting it up with 2 people(2 shifts ) is best. I would be happy to help. Alan

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You have come to the right place. first off is your father able to walk,go to the bath room by himself .we need to talk .

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Susan in Jackson, MO
July 23, 2018

BACKGROUND CHECKS !!!

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Lori in Oxnard, CA
April 23, 2018

care.com has a lot of tips and advice and resources available to everyone needing help. post a job after evaluating the level of care needed then decide the amount of pay you can afford. caregivers will respond based on your needs and the pay . Then review the responses and set up interviews. The process is not easy and will be time consuming. You may not find the right fit right away it may take a while to get the right caregiver for your loved ones needs. personalities need to click. you will know when you have found the right person. dont give up. care .com has great advice on how to approach the hiring process. good luck.

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Make sure you hire someone from a reputable company and definitely do background checks and ask around, word of mouth is usually the best option. Yes, there should be rules and expectations. Its still his home and whomever goes to live there should still abide by his rules. You have to be so careful because there are many deceitful people looking to take advantage of the elderly. Let them know up front what you expect out of them and cameras never hurt!

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