The Tutoring and Lessons Job Guide: The Tutoring Job Interview

How to interview for a tutoring or lessons job

Now that you've decided what to teach and how much to charge, the next step is the interview. If you haven't had much experience with interviews, try not to be intimidated. After all, you'll be assessing whether the job is right for you, just as your potential employer will be deciding whether you are right for the job.

Preparing for the questions you will be asked

The interview will let employers assess whether or not you can offer the kind of tutoring or lessons they want based on your credentials, experience, personality and character.

Be prepared to discuss:

  • your work history and credentials
  • your background in the subject (i.e. are you a Math Tutor, an English Tutor, etc.)
  • your experience teaching
  • your reasons for teaching
  • examples of previous successes when teaching
  • your teaching philosophy and strategies
  • how you will motivate students
  • how you will measure success
  • whether or not you feel you can work successfully with their child
  • how reliable you are

You'll also want to convey to the parents that their children will be safe with you. It might help to proactively offer to allow them to run a background check on you. (It might be helpful to run one on yourself in advance so that you will be prepared to discuss any blemishes  that may turn up.) Visit our Care.com Safety Tips for more information on background checks. 

Preparing for the questions you will ask

Interviewing is a two-way street. In addition to answering your potential employer's questions, you will want find out about the student, as well as the person to whom you will report. 

Be prepared to ask:

  • What the particular students or clientele are like. Are they temperamental or easy to get along with? Do they get frustrated easily?
  • Do they have any specific learning issues? ADD/ADHD? Dyslexia? Information processing problems? Organizational problems?
  • What strategies have worked or failed with the students in the past?
  • What are the students' strengths and weaknesses?
  • What will engage their interest and motivate them?
  • How long are their attention spans? How frequently will breaks be needed?
  • What will help to get them to focus after a break?
  • What are the client's goals for the tutoring or lessons?
  • What are the students' goals?

After the interview, think back about what you have learned. Do you feel that you can work well with the particular students or clientele? With the employer? Will you enjoy teaching the subject matter under the specific circumstances of this job?

If your answers to these questions are yes, and you receive a job offer, you will want to set up a communication schedule that will help create job satisfaction and success. 

Previous: How Much to Charge for Tutoring & Lessons « Next: Tutoring Job Satisfaction and Success »
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Comments (2)
Photo of Jessie B.
Jessie B.
Do one yourself and give it to them
Posted: September 08, 2011 at 6:03 AM
Richard W.
you mentioned allowing people to do a background check before hiring. I have nothing to hide, but would be reluctant to give my SS# to get this done. Any thoughts.

Richard
Posted: August 19, 2011 at 1:03 PM
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